Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
The Regents Park

The Regents Park is the park with the most sports fields in central London and has a wide range of activities. There is an open air theater, the London Zoo and many cafes and restaurants.

Henry VIII designated The Regent’s Park as a hunting ground, which he considered an invigorating ride from Whitehall Palace. If he were alive, he would hardly recognize the park with its stylized gardens and sports fields.

Regent’s Park is more than worth a visit. In the Inner Circle are the Queen Marie’s Gardens with beautiful rose gardens. And the Japanese garden is also very beautiful.

Opening Hours

Every day from 5 am to 9 pm.

How to get there

Regen’s Park, Great Portland Street, Baker Street, St John’s Wood, Camden Town
Regent’s Park (Stop A): 18, 27, 205, 453 London Zoo (Stop J): 274
The Tennis Courts, London Zoo, London Zoo Car Park, Prince Albert Road
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Other things to do you'd might like​

Kensington Palace

Kensington Palace

Explore the birthplace of Queen Victoria and the home of the young royals. Follow in the footsteps of royalties in Victoria’s refurbished children’s rooms, the beautiful King’s State Apartments and the famous Sunken Garden.

Leadenhall Market

Leadenhall Market

Leadenhall Market is an indoor market on Gracechurch Street in the city of London. The market was built in the 14th century. It is open from Monday to Friday, and there are mainly butcher shops, flower shops and cheese shops. The decorated roof was designed by Sir Horace Jones in 1881. But Leadenhall Market is

Sherlock Holmes Museum

Sherlock Holmes Museum

In the Sherlock Holmes Museum you can experience how Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson lived on 221b Baker Street from 1881-1904, according to the stories of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. The house was last used as a guest house in 1936 and the famous study on the 1st floor, from which you overlook Baker Street,

Greenwich Park

Greenwich Park

Greenwich Park covers 73 hectares and is the oldest royal park. Greenwich Park is on a hill, with impressive views across the Thames to the Docklands and the city of London, between Blackheath and the Thames on the edge of Maritime Greenwich. Several historic buildings can be found in the immediate vicinity, including the Royal

The Monument

The Monument to the Great Fire, or simply called The Monument, is one of London’s most striking sights and visitor attractions. The Monument stands at the intersection of Monument Street and Fish Street Hill. It was built between 1671 and 1677 to commemorate the Great Fire of 1666 and to celebrate the rebuilding of the