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The Monument to the Great Fire, or simply called The Monument, is one of London’s most striking sights and visitor attractions.

The Monument stands at the intersection of Monument Street and Fish Street Hill. It was built between 1671 and 1677 to commemorate the Great Fire of 1666 and to celebrate the rebuilding of the city.

The Monument is 62 meters high and that is exactly the distance from the monument to the bakery where the big fire started in Pudding Lane.

From The Monument you have a beautiful view, but beware you have to go up a narrow spiral staircase with 311 steps and of course down again.

You can book tickets in combination with the Tower Bridge Experience below. Otherwise the ticket price is around €6 for an adult and can only be bought on site.

Opening Hours

April – September:
9:30 am – 6:00 pm daily

October – March:
Daily 9:30 am – 5:30 pm

Last admission: half an hour before closing.

The Monument is closed from December 24 – 26.

How to get there

London Bridge, Fenchurch Street
Monument: 15
Monument Street

Prices

Prices for standard tickets and are indications.

Children
7,-
  •  
Adults
15,-
  •  
Concession*
10,-
  •  

* Concession: Seniors and students on presentation of identification / student pass.

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