Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

The Monument to the Great Fire, or simply called The Monument, is one of London’s most striking sights and visitor attractions.

The Monument stands at the intersection of Monument Street and Fish Street Hill. It was built between 1671 and 1677 to commemorate the Great Fire of 1666 and to celebrate the rebuilding of the city.

The Monument is 62 meters high and that is exactly the distance from the monument to the bakery where the big fire started in Pudding Lane.

From The Monument you have a beautiful view, but beware you have to go up a narrow spiral staircase with 311 steps and of course down again.

You can book tickets in combination with the Tower Bridge Experience below. Otherwise the ticket price is around €6 for an adult and can only be bought on site.

Opening Hours

April – September:
9:30 am – 6:00 pm daily

October – March:
Daily 9:30 am – 5:30 pm

Last admission: half an hour before closing.

The Monument is closed from December 24 – 26.

How to get there

London Bridge, Fenchurch Street
Monument: 15
Monument Street

Prices

Prices for standard tickets and are indications.

Children
7,-
  •  
Adults
15,-
  •  
Concession*
10,-
  •  

* Concession: Seniors and students on presentation of identification / student pass.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Other things to do you'd might like​

Sherlock Holmes Museum

Sherlock Holmes Museum

In the Sherlock Holmes Museum you can experience how Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson lived on 221b Baker Street from 1881-1904, according to the stories of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. The house was last used as a guest house in 1936 and the famous study on the 1st floor, from which you overlook Baker Street,

Wallace Collection

The Wallace Collection consists of historical pieces (paintings, jewelery, porcelain, furniture, armor and coins) from the private collection of Richard Wallace. The largest part of the collection is French 18th-century art with, among other things, a state portrait of Louis XV and a canvas by Jean-Honoré Fragonard. In addition, the collection has 26 canvases by

Burlington Arcade

Burlington Arcade

In 1818 Lord George Cavendish, later Earl of Burlington, commissioned his architect Samuel Ware to design a shopping gallery for the sale of jewelry and luxury items. Since the first day that Burlington Arcade opened its gates in 1819, it was a smash hit. Now, two centuries later, Burlington Arcade has lost none of its

Kensington Gardens

Kensington Gardens

Kensington Gardens was originally just a piece of land which was a part of Hyde Park, which was bought by William III 1689. The king, who suffered from asthma, found the location calm and the air favorable. That is why he commissioned Sir Christopher Wren to build the red brick building Kensington Palace . Queen

London Eye

The London Eye, with its more than 137 meters, is the world’s largest observation wheel. During a half-hour flight in one of the 32 high-tech capsules you get a spectacular view of London. At the highest point you have a 360 degree view of London and on a clear day you can see up to