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The Castle Cinema

The Castle Cinema has seen numerous changes, and been many things to many people, since it was first built more than 100 years ago…

The Castle Electric Theatre opened on 8th September 1913 as an independent single-screen cinema. Total seating was provided for 619 in stalls and a small balcony area.

It ran until 1958 when it was turned into a bingo hall, then a warehouse and most recently a snooker hall. Over time it had become pretty dilapidated, but many of its original features remained, hidden from view.

In 2016 some enthousiastic people decided to reopen the cinema, but they wanted to know if there was support for a cinema in Hackney. So they started a Kickstarter campaign, which raised 120% of the target. So the cinema was renovated and reopend again.

Other great luxury cinemas are: The Electric Cinema Portobello, Genesis Cinema Whitechapel and Screen on the Green.

Opening Hours

11am – 11pm every day (except Christmas Day!)

How to get there

Homerton
236, 242, 308
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