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St Paul's Cathedral

St Pauls Catherdral, with its huge dome, is an iconic feature of london’s skyline and known around the world.

As you step inside, you’ll be amazed at the awe-inspiring interior of the cathedral and discover fascinating stories about history, spread over five levels, the highest of which gives you unparalleled views of London.

Opening Hours

Monday to Saturday:
Cathedral from 8:30 a.m.
Dome Galleries from 9:30 a.m.

Last admission is at 4:30 p.m.

St Paul’s, Mansion House, Blackfriars, Bank
St Paul’s Cathedral (Stop SK): 11, 15, 17, 26, 76 New Change Cannon Street (Stop SL): 4, 76, 521
Godliman Street, Newgate Street, King Edward Street, Queen Victoria Street, Cheap Side

Prices

Prices for standard tickets and are indications.

Children
9,-
  •  
Adults
21,-
  •  
Concession*
18,-
  •  

* Concession: Seniors and students on presentation of identification / student pass.

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