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Queen's House

The Queen’s House was built in 1616 by order of Anne of Denmark, the wife of James I. It is the masterpiece of the English architect Inigo Jones. It was completed in 1638, after James’ son Charles I gave the house to his Queen, Henrietta Maria.

Initially used as a private residence, the Queen’s House is nowadays used as a museum. Here the special painting collections of the Museum are exhibited.

It is haunted in the Queen’s House. Rev Hardy took photographs of this. Various scientists have labeled them authentic.

The Queen’s House is nowadays part of the National Maritime Museum, which also includes the Royal Observatory Greenwich. In the immediate area is also the Cutty Sark and the Old Old Royal Naval College.

Like most museums in London, this museum is also free of charge.

Opening Hours

Every day from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

How to get there

Greenwich Church Street (Stop B): 188, 199 Greenwich Town Centre / Cutty Sark (Stop C/D): 286
Cutty Sark
Greenwich Pier
Saunders Ness Road
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