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National Maritime Museum

The National Maritime Museum is in the heart of historic Greenwich. The museum displays the history of the British at sea. It is the most important and largest collection of its kind.

In the new gallery you will find the royal boat of Prince Frederick, the round-the-world yacht “Suhaili” and many ship models such as the very latest cruise ships.

The museum is housed in a former veteran home and hospital school and offers fantastic views of the Thames from its elevated position. Visitors get an impression of British maritime history through interactive exhibitions, poetry, paintings and photographs.

The nearby Royal Observatory Greenwich and the Queen’s House are part of the National Maritime Museum.

Like most museums in London, this museum is also free of charge.

Opening Hours

Every day from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

How to get there

Greenwich Church Street (Stop B): 188, 199 Greenwich Town Centre / Cutty Sark (Stop C/D): 286
Cutty Sark
Greenwich Pier
Saunders Ness Road
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