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Kensington Gardens

Kensington Gardens was originally just a piece of land which was a part of Hyde Park, which was bought by William III 1689.

The king, who suffered from asthma, found the location calm and the air favorable. That is why he commissioned Sir Christopher Wren to build the red brick building Kensington Palace . Queen Anne enlarged the palace garden by ‘relocating’ 12 km² of land from Hyde Park and was responsible in 1704 for the establishment of the Orangery.

The gardens are a popular spot for picnickers and sun worshipers in good weather. There are also different walking routes. The footpaths are used intensively by joggers and runners. Cycling is permitted on the marked trails connecting the Queen’s Gate with West Carriage Drive, Mount Gate with the Broad Walk and the Broad Walk from Lion Gate to Palace Gate.

The Diana Memorial Playground of the Princess of Wales is a fantastic playground for children up to 12 years. More than 70,000 children enjoy this playground every year.

Opening Hours

Daily from 6 am to 6:45 pm.

How to get there

Lancaster Gate, Queensway, Bayswater, Hight Street Kensington
Er zijn zoveel bushaltes rondom Kensington Gardens, bekijk hiervoor de kaart.
Black Lion Gate, Palace Gate, Queen’s Gate, De Vere Gardens, Queen’s Gate (North), Kensington Gore, Serpentine Car Park
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