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Hyde Park.

Hyde Park is one of London’s most beautiful parks and covers 140 hectares. Hyde Park offers space for various forms of leisure activities and sports. Various events are also held from small to large. That is why Live Aid 2005 was held here.

It is hard to imagine that when Henry VIII and his court were still hunting through Hyde Park for deer and wild boar in 1536, years later tai chi was practiced between the trees in the early morning and the voice of the Italian tenor Pavarotti echoed through the park.

Speaker’s Corner, the birthplace of freedom of speech, is located in the north-east of the park. Every Sunday morning speakers give their opinion on all sorts of topics. They do this in their own unique way and with great passion.

Opening Hours

Every day from 5 am to midnight.

How to get there

Lancaster Gate, Marble Arch, Hyde Park Corner en Knightsbridge
Er zijn zoveel bushaltes rondom Hyde Park, controleer hiervoor de kaart.
Park Lane, Green Street, Bayswater Road, Black Lion Gate, Queen’s Gate, Serpentine Car Park, Palace Gate, De Vere Gardens, Queen’s Gate (North), Serpentine Car Park, Albert Gate, Knightsbridge, Hyde Park Corner
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