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Charles Dickens Museum

This is the house where Charles Dickens Oliver Twist, The Pickwick Papers and Nicholas Nickleby wrote. There, for the first time, he gained international fame as one of the world’s greatest storytellers.

Opening Hours

January – November:

Tuesday – Sunday: 10 – 5 p.m.

December:

Daily: 10 – 5 p.m.

Last admission: 4 p.m.

Russell Square , Chancery Lane, Holborn, Kings Cross St Pancras
Guilford Street (Stop HD en HC): 17, 46 Gray’s Inn Road (Stop CA): 19, 38, 243
Guilford Street, Northington Street

Prices

Prices for standard tickets and are indications.

Children
6,-
  •  
Adults
12,-
  •  
Concession*
9,-
  •  

* Concession: Seniors and students on presentation of identification / student pass.

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