Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Buckingham Palace is the official residence of Queen Elisabeth II. However, it has not always been a palace. Originally this was the mansion of the riotous “Duke of Buckingham”. King George III bought the mansion in 1762 for his wife Charlotte. Buckingham House then became known as the “Queens House”. 14 of George III his children were born here.

When George IV took the throne, he decided to turn Buckingham House into a palace. He hired John Nash to realize this renovation. The surface of the house was doubled by the construction of a new wing in the French Neo-classical style, which George IV loved so much. Marble Arch was also built to celebrate the king’s victories at Trafalgar and Waterloo. However, the refurbishment got out of hand financially, in 1829 the costs for the refurbishment amounted to nearly half a million pounds. John Nash was then fired.

Queen Victoria is the first ruler to move to Buckingham Palace in 1837. However, she thought there were too few bedrooms. To make room for a new 4th wing, Marble Arch was moved to the current location.

You can always see if the Queen is at home. If the Royal Standard is in top, then she is home. Otherwise the Union Jack is in top.

Depending on the time of the year, the changing of the guard takes place in front of the palace every day, an impressive ceremony with a great deal of military splendor. The ceremony takes place at 11.30 am. Make sure that you are there in time to get a good spot so that you can shoot nice pictures. Check the website of the Household Division for the current schedule.

Buckingham Palace has been in July, August and September in the summer months since 1993, when the royal family is on holiday, partially open to visitors. The “State Room”, the “Grand Staircase”, the throne room and various other parts of the palace can then be visited. You can also take a look at the “Queens Gallery”. There are paintings by Rembrandt, Rubens and Van Dyck, among others. The entrance fee that is requested is used for the restoration of the fire-struck Windsor Castle.

Virtual Tour

Opening Hours

18 July to 31 August 2020:

From 9:30 AM to 7:30 PM.
Last entrance: 5:15 p.m.

1 September to 27 September 2020:

From 9:30 AM to 6:30 PM.
Last entrance: 4:15 p.m.

How to get there

Victoria Station, Green Park, St. James’ Park
Buckingham Palace Road: 11, 211, C1 en C10
Buckingham Gate, Warwick Row, Victoria Station

Prices

Prices for standard tickets and are indications.

Adults
30,-
  •  
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Other things to do you'd might like​

Kensington Palace

Kensington Palace

Explore the birthplace of Queen Victoria and the home of the young royals. Follow in the footsteps of royalties in Victoria’s refurbished children’s rooms, the beautiful King’s State Apartments and the famous Sunken Garden.

China Town

China Town

Between Lisle Street, Gerard Street, Shaftesbury Avenue and Leicester Square is China Town. This is the heart of the Chinese community in London. Here you will find all kinds of Chinese shops and restaurants. China Town really comes alive in February when the Chinese New Year starts. You will find China Town between Lisle Street,

St. Katherine's Dock

St. Katharines Dock

Located directly next to Tower Bridge and the Tower of London is St. Katharines Dock has been the centerpiece of international trade for more than 1,000 years. Once a working dock, now one of London’s undiscovered treasures. Waterfront with a mix of shops, restaurants and luxury apartments and London’s main marina. This historic site also

Tower Bridge

Tower Bridge

Tower Bridge is one of the most characteristic, recognizable bridges in the world. The bridge was completed in 1894, after 8 years of construction work. However, many people do not know why this bridge was built and why it is so different from all other bridges in London. At the time, London Bridge was the

London Transport Museum

The London Transport Museum shows the history and development of transport in London on the basis of photos, models and used vehicles. A must for lovers of railway museums and also very nice for children. The London Transport Museum is in the middle of Covent Garden, so there is plenty to do in the area.

National Maritime Museum

National Maritime Museum

The National Maritime Museum is in the heart of historic Greenwich. The museum displays the history of the British at sea. It is the most important and largest collection of its kind. In the new gallery you will find the royal boat of Prince Frederick, the round-the-world yacht “Suhaili” and many ship models such as

Tate Britain

Tate Britain, until 1932 the National Gallery of British Art and then the Tate Gallery, is housed on the site of the former Millbank Prison. The main building was designed by Sidney R. J. Smith with a classicist colonnade and a dome vault. Construction started in 1893 and the museum was opened on July 21,

ArcelorMittal Orbit

View all of London from the highest artwork in the UK. Dare to go from the longest and highest tunnel slide in the world. Or simply enjoy the breathtaking view of the London skyline. Created by Anish Kapoor and Cecil Balmond, the beautiful looping structure of the ArcelorMittal Orbit is an iconic symbol of the