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The Big Ben is one of London’s best-known buildings and looks the most spectacular when the clock is lit in the evening. You can also see when the parliament is in session , because then a lamp burns above the clock.

The name Big Ben is not actually the name of the clock tower, but of the 13-tonne clock hanging in it. The clock is named after the first Commissioner of Works, Sir Benjamin Hall.

The clock rings every hour and has stopped working only a few times. The last time was in 1976. The clock began to fall apart due to metal fatigue. As a result, certain parts of the mechanism started to rotate faster, causing the clock to turn itself almost to pieces. The clock was then restored, which lasted more than a year.

The Big Ben is part of the Houses of Parliament. Unfortunately, Big Ben can only be admired from outside. Tours are not currently available. Yet well worth seeing.

Opening Hours

Due to renovation work, no tours are currently being given.

How to get there

Westminster
Westminster Station Bridge Street (Stop H): 148
Westminster Pier, London Eye Pier
Westminster Pier
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