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Alexander Fleming Laboratory Museum

Penicillin was discovered by Alexander Fleming in a small, dusty laboratory at St Mary’s Hospital in 1928. This discovery triggered a revolution in the medical world, and few people have benefited from it. The laboratory has been restored to its old, small condition when a petri dish became contaminated with bacteria by a mysterious fungus with monumental consequences for human health.

Visitors to the museum can follow in the footsteps of Fleming as they explore the birthplace of the penicillin. A journey that takes the visitor to the days where there were no antibiotics to fight deadly bacteria. After a visit to the laboratory, where the discovery was made and how it all originated, displays and a video tell the remarkable story of Alexander Fleming, the man and scientist, and the discovery and development of penicillin. You can also download a brochure from the museum, click here.

Named an International Historic Chemical Landmark in 1999 by the American Chemical Society and the Royal Society of Chemistry, the museum welcomed visitors from all over the world.

Opening Hours

Monday to Thursday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

How to get there

Paddington
St Mary’s Hospital (Stop P): 7, 23, 27, 36, 205, 332
Paddington
Southwarf Road, St Mary’s Hospital
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